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Poster: BornEasement Date: Oct 9, 2011 8:19am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: The Canterbury Tales

247 - Out of the hive came forth a swarm of bees;
So hideous was the noise - God bless us all,
Jack Straw and all his followers in their brawl
Were never half so shrill, for all their noise,
When they were murdering those Flemish boys,
As that days hue and cry upon the fox.

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Poster: Arbuthnot Date: Oct 9, 2011 9:32am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Buk

Be Kind

we are always asked
to understand the other person's
viewpoint
no matter how
out-dated
foolish or
obnoxious.

one is asked
to view
their total error
their life-waste
with
kindliness,
especially if they are
aged.

but age is the total of
our doing.
they have aged
badly
because they have
lived
out of focus,
they have refused to
see.

not their fault?

whose fault?
mine?

I am asked to hide
my viewpoint
from them
for fear of their
fear.

age is no crime

but the shame
of a deliberately
wasted
life

among so many
deliberately
wasted
lives

is.

Charles Bukowski

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Poster: micah6vs8 Date: Oct 9, 2011 10:02am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Buk & Bly

Snowbanks North of the House

Those great sweeps of snow that stop suddenly six
feet from the house ...
Thoughts that go so far.
The boy gets out of high school and reads no more
books;
the son stops calling home.
The mother puts down her rolling pin and makes no
more bread.
And the wife looks at her husband one night at a
party, and loves him no more.
The energy leaves the wine, and the minister falls
leaving the church.
It will not come closer
the one inside moves back, and the hands touch
nothing, and are safe.

The father grieves for his son, and will not leave the
room where the coffin stands.
He turns away from his wife, and she sleeps alone.

And the sea lifts and falls all night, the moon goes on
through the unattached heavens alone.

The toe of the shoe pivots
in the dust ...
And the man in the black coat turns, and goes back
down the hill.
No one knows why he came, or why he turned away,
and did not climb the hill.

-R.B.

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Poster: Arbuthnot Date: Oct 9, 2011 10:15am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Buk & Bly

Micah, thanks so much for the RB; i met him a couple of times in the early '90s, he is such an amazing individual and poet; i don't have time to type it out as i'm heading out on the bike trail shortly, but i think you'll appreciate the attached scan; cheers

Attachment: Bly_Limantour_Dunes.jpg

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Poster: micah6vs8 Date: Oct 9, 2011 10:39am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Buk & Bly

Thanks for that Arb. My heart touched and even a tiny tear.

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Poster: AltheaRose Date: Oct 9, 2011 10:15am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: The Canterbury Tales

Or, as Chaucer actually put it:

Certes, he Jakke Straw and his meynee
Ne made nevere shoutes half so shille,
Whan that they wolden any Flemyng kille,
As thilke day was maad upon the fox.
Of bras they broghten bemes and of box,
Of horn, of boon, in whiche they blewe and powped,
And therwithal they skriked and they howped,
It seemed as that hevene sholde falle!

The Nun's Priest's Tale,

http://www.librarius.com/canttran/nunprst/nunprst609-635.htm